Heartwood Community Cafe

"Do you have hope for the church?"

(Michael Vidler) (Michael Vidler)

When I arrived in Vancouver a month ago, I wasn't sure where my Vancouver Biennale project would take me. I've led numerous workshops, had a few performances and met some incredible people who have inspired, encouraged and challenged me. My mind and heart have been filled with thoughtful dialogue, as well as powerful stories and perspectives.

In my workshops and meetings, people have raised questions and comments that have caused me to reflect on my project and what it looks like to build bridges between LGBTQ, Christian and feminist communities:

  • “Is this pain worth it?”
  • “I think it comes out as hate, but a lot of the time it’s actually fear… People are just trying to protect themselves.”
  • "I want to step into community that understand me."
  • “I feel really disoriented because I feel like I have to hide parts of myself from different people.”
  • “The healing part is figuring out in all the displacement, how we can find place and hold one another.”
  • “We need to put ourselves in other people's shoes... The shoes may feel uncomfortable."
  • "Do you have hope for the church?"

(roaming-the-planet)

(Jarrah Hodge)

When that person asked me if I had hope for the church and these communities, I told him I couldn't do this work if I didn't have hope. I have to believe that change is possible for these seemingly dissimilar communities. I've seen movement and transformation in these spaces, even if it's slow and takes a long time.

Identity is complex and difficult, but I also believe that understanding and reconciliation can occur between LGBTQ, Christian and feminist communities. There's a hunger for these conversations, and a strong desire to find community and belonging.

This project is also timely in Vancouver.

The Vancouver School Board recently passed a new policy that allows transgender students to be addressed by the name and pronoun that best represents their gender identity. The changes also discourage sex-segregated activities and allow transgender students to use whatever washroom they feel most comfortable.

Chinese and Christian parents have been represented as a homogenous group by the media, tying race and faith to homophobia and transphobia. For example, the Globe and Mail's Margaret Wente recently wrote about the policy and said, "Many of the Chinese parents, like Ms. Chang, are Christians..." She didn't check her facts because Cheryl Chang is actually white.

I recently chatted with Fiona Chen, a Chinese-Christian mother who defended the new policy and has been outspoken about supporting her transgender child. I admire her courage to tell her story, as well as the stereotypes she is breaking down and bridges she is building. You can hear more of her story in this CBC interview.

Fiona's story and desire to fight for her son has encouraged me to keep fighting. 

This work is tough, but I know it's worth it. It's worth the risk, pain and messiness. Change occurs when we fight and are unwilling to accept the status quo – especially when that marginalizes individuals and tells them they are worthless.

I'm looking forward to my final event where I'll bring together voices from my workshops and various conversations. There will be some spoken word poetry, storytelling and video this Saturday, June 28 at Our Town Cafe at 7pm. There’s a hunger here for these discussions and I hope my time here starts more conversations in Vancouver.

Check out some photos from my workshops at Mount Pleasant Neighbourhood House and Heartwood Community Cafe. Heartwood is a beautiful space that focuses on community building and social justice, so check it out if you have a chance!

Let the Vancouver Biennale adventures begin!

It has been just over a week since I arrived in Vancouver, and I’ve already met some incredible people who are doing amazing work. I’m excited to be part of the Vancouver Biennale and for the opportunity to connect with other artists and community partners. I've already learned a lot from those around me and it has been great spending time with other Biennale artists, including Andreas Strauss and my coordinator, Ken Lum.

(Andreas Strauss)

Exploring a studio space. (Andreas Strauss)

I love new adventures and exploring new places. It has been refreshing creatively to be here, and I've enjoyed taking the time to dream big and appreciate my surroundings. It's easy to move through life quickly, and forget to slow down and soak up the little moments.

A beautiful discovery on a hike with my friend. (Jenna Tenn-Yuk)

Meet my friend, Molly. (Amanda Watson)

I'm drawn to passionate people who want to make a difference in their communities, and there's definitely exciting work happening in Vancouver. I've connected with some movers and shakers here, and I'm thrilled to be part of fostering this dialogue.

This week, I'll be starting my workshops and I have a few performances and interviews. Feel free to tune in and/or check out the workshops if you're in Vancouver.

I'm excited to see what happens as people explore the complexities of identity, spirituality and sexuality. I hope participants will see the power of their voices and will mutually learn from one another through their stories.

The F Word interview Date: Monday, June 9 Time: 12pm Vancouver Co-op Radio (online) or CFRO 100.5FM (Vancouver)

Vancouver Poetry Slam performance Date: Monday, June 9 Time: 8pm Place: Café Deux Soleils (2096 Commercial Dr)

Spoken word workshop Date: Wednesday, June 11 Time: 7pm Place: Heartwood Community Café (317 E Broadway) Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1504765246404418

Spoken word workshop Date: Sunday, June 15 Time: 1pm Place: Heartwood Community Cafe (317 E Broadway) Event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1504765246404418

I'll be writing some blog posts for the Vancouver Biennale, so look out for more of my Vancouver adventures! I'll also share how a random hug with a stranger three months ago got me here. Spoiler alert: that stranger happened to be the founder of the Vancouver Biennale, Barrie Mowatt.